“Women Listen, The Remix” with guest Kaisha Blackstone

WLTR-Special-Edition-300x300Relive last night’s powerful episode of #WomenListenTheRemix on Bonnerfide Radio feat @BrightGirlMedia @kaisha @CarmellaPee. http://bit.ly/13Mx28X

“Tonight on Women Listen: The Remix, we ask the question “Can we REALLY have it all?!” Is it possible for men and women to really have success in both a career and family at the same time? Don’t miss this thought-provoking conversation as our hosts Ken Mosley, V. George Smith, and Gerard Bonner welcome special guests Chanelle Yarber, Kaisha Blackstone, and Carmell Scott. Music from Fantasia, PJ Morton, Whitney Houston, and more.”

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Get “So Thankful” on Bone Appetit, Volume 1 NOW!

Get the new song “So Thankful” by Jeff Bradshaw featuring CoKo which I co-wrote with Jeff. Then make sure you you call your local radio station to request it! Let’s keep getting good music out there people!

*thumbs up and a smile* -Kaisha

Download “So Thankful” Now on iTunes!

 

Request the New Single “I Believe” on Local Radio!

Just in time for Good Friday! 🙂 Get the new single, “I Believe” by Onitsha which I co-wrote with Onitsha, Adam Blackstone and KC Knight. Then make sure you you call your local radio station to request it! Let’s get good music out there people!

*super big cyber-hug* -Kaisha

Download “I Believe” Now on iTunes!

Request “I Believe” on Your Local Radio Station!

Black History Month Obscure Fact #29

In the mid 1800s Philadelphia was known as “The Black Capital of Anti–Slavery,” because of the strong abolitionist presence there and such groups as The Philadelphia Female Anti–Slavery Society, The Philadelphia Young Men’s Anti–Slavery Society and The Philadelphia Anti–Slavery Society.

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Black History Month Obscure Fact #28

 started the first doctoral chemistry program at a black college. Born on February 9, 1918, in Oakland, Calif., Dr. Ferguson’s family lost everything during the Great Depression. However, he bought a chemistry set at 12 and experimented in a backyard shed that he built himself. In high school, Ferguson developed and products such as moth repellent, spot remover and silver polish. His high-school chemistry teacher recognized his ability and encouraged Ferguson to go to college and pursue chemistry as a career.

After graduating from high school, he worked as a porter for the Southern Pacific Railway Company in order to save enough money to enroll at the University of California, Berkeley. In 1940, he earned a B.S. in chemistry and later went on to become the first African-American to earn a doctoral degree in chemistry at Berkeley. Dr. Ferguson worked with famous chemists such as Melvin Calvin and Glenn T. Seaborg.

Dr. Ferguson taught at Howard University, North Carolina A&T, California State University Los Angeles, Bennett College and the University of Nairobi, Kenya. In 1953, the Guggenheim awarded him a fellowship, which took him to the Carlsberg Laboratory in Copenhagen, Denmark. Between 1961 and 1962 he was a National Science Foundation fellow at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.

Dr. Ferguson published more than six textbooks that are still used worldwide and translated into several languages including Mandarin, Hindu and Swahili. Universities in the South used Dr. Ferguson’s textbooks and research before African-Americans were allowed to teach or attend many of those same universities.

(Source: Kessler, J. H.; Kidd, J. S.; Kidd, R. A.; Morin, K. H. Distinguished African American Scientists of the 20th Century, Oryx Press,1996; World of Chemistry: http://www.bookrags.com/biography/lloyd-n-ferguson-woc/; Journal of Chemical Education Online: http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Features/eChemists/Bios/Ferguson.html)

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