Black History Month Obscure Fact #11

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall said he was punished for misbehavior in school by being forced to write copies of the Constitution. He said this later piqued his interest in politics.

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall was a classmate of Harlem Renaissance writer Langston Hughes during their studies at Lincoln University.

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Black History Month Obscure Fact #10

Most people think Lawrence Douglas Wilder was the first black governor in the United States. They are partially correct. He was the first black governor elected. The first black governor to serve was actually Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback in 1872. He was serving as lieutenant governor at the time, and the sitting governor was impeached.

(Source: “African-American Firsts: Famous, little-known and unsung triumphs of blacks in America,” by Joan Potter with Constance Claytor. Pinto Press, 1994)

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Black History Month Obscure Fact #9

African-American fashion designer Ann Lowe designed the wedding dress of Jacqueline Bouvier, the bride of future president, Senator John F. Kennedy.

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Black History Month Obscure Fact #8

African-Americans were among the first non-Native settlers of the Ohio Valley. For example, when Knox County, Ohio, was established, there were already famous blacks living there. One was an expert stable hand and horse handler, Enoch “Knuck” Harris. Although, most blacks were servants to white families, they were generally not slaves and eventually obtained and farmed small parcels of land.

(Source: “1001 Things Everyone Should Know about African American History,” by Jeffrey C. Stewart. Doubleday, 1996)

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Black History Month Obscure Fact #7

Nat “Deadwood Dick” Love, a renowned and skilled cowboy, was the only African-American cowboy to write his autobiography The Life and Adventures of Nat Love, Better Known in the Cattle Country as Deadwood Dick, published in 1907.

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